Hilton Heiress Nicky Hilton Sports a Large Diamond Solitaire Engagement Ring

Capture the Essence! of Nicky Hilton Glamour with this 2.77-Carat Old European Cut Diamond Solitaire Engagement Ring. Photo ©2014 EraGem Jewelry.

Capture the Essence! of Nicky Hilton Glamour with this 2.77-Carat Old European Cut Diamond Solitaire Engagement Ring. Photo ©2014 EraGem Jewelry.

Nicky Hilton is keeping her dazzling diamond engagement ring under wraps. Paparazzi have managed to capture only three views of the ring so far. In one series of photos, Ms. Hilton wears the diamond nestled against her palm. E!Online has published a second close-up photo of Ms. Hilton on her cell phone, sporting what appears to be a cathedral-style, prong-set diamond solitaire on a platinum or yellow gold band. The ring is turned slightly inward toward her palm, so further details are impossible to discern.

In another of E!Online’s photos, we glimpse the only head-on view of her ring. Ms. Hilton stands on the banks of a river casting a fishing line in her beautiful designer clothes. On her left ring finger all we see is a flash of brilliant white light. The one thing we can surmise from this shot is that that diamond is a doozy.

Ms. Hilton received the ring from her long-term boyfriend, banking heir James Rothschild, on August 12. Rumor has it that shortly after surprising her parents with a visit to ask for her hand in marriage, the young heir took Ms. Hilton to Italy to celebrate their third anniversary together. According to online sources, Mr. Rothschild proposed on a boat ride in the middle of Lake Como.

The Origins of One of the Rarest Gemstones on Earth, Alexandrite

Capture the Essence! of Exclusivity with this AGTA-Certified Alexandrite Engagement Ring. Photo ©2014 EraGem Jewelry.

Capture the Essence! of Exclusivity with this AGTA-Certified Alexandrite Engagement Ring. Photo ©2014 EraGem Jewelry.

Alexandrite is among the rarest of gemstones found in the earth. Its hardness, beauty, and rarity make it a particularly becoming choice for engagement rings. Its history is short, but gloriously rich. There are only a few known sources for gem-quality specimens, which makes its presence in contemporary jewelry fairly uncommon.

Alexandrite was initially discovered in the 1830s, in the emerald mines of the Ural Mountains of Russia. The bright green stone was at first mistaken for emerald, until the sun went down. In the light of candles, its greenish hue vanished and a bright purplish-red took its place.

This was no emerald. Not only did it exhibit this extraordinary dichroism, but this new stone also proved to be far harder than emerald, registering an 8.5 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness.

A Brand New Gemstone

Its discovery is most commonly attributed to the Finnish mineralogist Nils Gustaf Nordenskjold (1792-1866). Others attribute its discovery to the man who ended up naming the stone, Count Lev Alekseevich Perovskii (1792-1856). Count Perovskii was an important nobleman and politician in Russia. He was also an avid mineralogist.

In truth, it is unlikely that either of these men drew the first sample out of the ground. However, they were among the first to put it under the microscope and are therefore credited with its ‘discovery’ as a brand new gemstone.

In one version of events, the Count, perhaps perplexed by some of its non-emerald characteristics, is said to have sent a sample to Herra Nordenskjold for further study. The Finnish mineralogist at first mistook it for emerald, but its hardness caused him to investigate further. Looking long into the evening, the stone’s surprising change from green to red confirmed his suspicions: He was holding an exciting new gemstone in the chrysoberyl family. Having experienced this exciting revelation, he decided to give it a name.

Herra Nordenskjold went with diaphanite, based on its color-changing characteristic. This scientific name may have accompanied some documentation of the stone, but in the end it wouldn’t stick. In a move motivated by politics, the Count stepped in and made a grand gesture. On April 17, 1834, he declared publicly that the new stone would be named after Russia’s future Tsar, Alexander Nikolaevich, who on that very day entered his majority (16th birthday).

The name stuck, and to this day alexandrites are linked inextricably with Tsarist Russia’s infamous history.

Exclusive Access

For the next 150 years, Russia enjoyed exclusive access to this new gemstone. Its rarity prevented it from saturating the market. However, those in noble and royal positions in Europe and America were privileged to purchase alexandrite jewels made by some of the world’s most prestigious jewelers, most prominently Russia’s court jeweler Carl Faberge and Tiffany & Co., whose access came through famed gem expert George Frederick Kunz.

Russia’s alexandrite remains the most desirable on the market, though most of it is housed in museums or prestigious collections. These Russian stones are characterized by strong saturation in shades of green to bluish-green in daylight and red to purplish-red in artificial or candle light. The color change in these stones is dramatic, and stones of this origin are valued around $100,000 per carat, more if the piece has historical value.

Although the Russian mines were depleted by the late 1890s, no new sources of alexandrite were discovered until 1987. Though this new Brazilian discovery could not compete with the history of Tsarist Russia, the grade of stones coming out of South America’s mines were in fact superior in color saturation. In a side by side comparison, historicity not withstanding, the value of Brazilian alexandrite would exceed that of Russian samples.

These beautiful Brazilian stones were characterized by a deep red purple in artificial light and rich verdant greens by day. Production from the Brazilian mines was high in the 1980s, but stores have dwindled significantly. More recent deposits are now sourced in Africa, the United States, Burma, and Sri Lanka.

However, for gem-quality specimens, it is to Sri Lanka that dealers primarily turn. Sri Lankan specimens run a bit larger than those found in Russia and Brazil, whose stones rarely exceed one carat. Sri Lankan color saturation is different, as well, with the greens tending toward the yellow end of the spectrum and the reds appearing brownish. While they can’t be compared to those originating in Russia or Brazil, these richly colored alexandrites from Sri Lanka make absolutely gorgeous jewels.

It cannot be overemphasized that faceted alexandrites of greater than two carats are extremely rare. The Russian and Brazilian mines have been depleted, and gemstone-quality alexandrites of a decent size are hard to find even in the Sri Lankan mines.

If you’re looking for a way to express your love in a unique way, we invite you to experience the wonder of the rare and beautiful alexandrite. Make an appointment today to see this beautiful ring for yourself.

To Complement Elaborate Necklaces Brides Are Choosing Chandelier Earrings with Some Color

Bridal jewelry trends are edging toward the elaborate, and this includes earrings. Not only are brides opting for showy dangle-style earrings, but more and more they’re opting for a touch of color, as well. Here we offer a few sophisticated choices for today’s bride, each with their own splash of color:

Natural Briolet Aquamarine & Diamond Chandelier Earrings

 

These striking estate chandelier earrings are crafted of solid platinum and feature a pair of briolette-cut natural aquamarine gemstones accented by genuine natural diamonds and bezel-set aquamarines. These earrings hang 3 inches and will add a touch of color and elegance to your bridal jewelry ensemble.

 

 

Natural Pink Sapphire & Diamond Dangle Earrings

 

These luscious dangle earrings feature a split drop and bow motif set with sparkling white diamonds. Dangling from each bow is a solitary briolette-cut pink sapphire which is further accented with white diamonds. These royal earrings are crafted of solid 18k white gold and will add a touch of pink, and a touch of class, to your special day.

Judy Mayfield Pearl & Blue Sapphire Drop Earrings 18k White Gold

 

 

 

If pearls are your wedding day choice, these Judy Mayfield pearl and sapphire earrings are the perfect accessory. These designer drop earrings are fashioned from solid 18k white gold and feature rope motifs surrounding a pair of bezel-set blue sapphires. Dropping from a line of diamonds and pearls are a pair of exquisite drop-shaped cultured pearls. These earrings exude contemporary elegance.

 

Hollywood’s First Vamp, Theda Bara, Ties the Knot in Secret Ceremony on July 2, 1921

Theda Bara as Cleopatra in 1917. Photo in public domain.

Theda Bara as Cleopatra in 1917. Photo in public domain.

She took other people’s minds off their troubles… ~The New York Times, 1955

by Angela Magnotti Andrews

She was Theda Bara, Hollywood’s first femme fatale, Fox Studio’s top-billing silent screen star between 1914 and 1919, and one of America’s most beloved actors, “ranking behind only Charlie Chaplin and Mary Pickford” {8}.

Taking her cues from the alluring Mata Hari and Sarah Bernhardt, Ms. Bara brought America’s favorite bad girl to the big screen–”a sultry, exotic, erotic woman who went through the world leaving broken men in her wake {3}.

Audiences could not get enough of her. Even decades later, the New York Times reported, “On the silent screen she appealed to men’s most primitive instincts. On the screen she was, indeed, a bad girl, and this was her allure” {4}.

Her kohl-lined eyes simmered on screen and off, and her publicists made sure that even those who knew they were being conned believed she was a “deadly…crystal gazing seeress of profoundly occult powers, wicked as fresh red paint and poisonous as dried spiders” {7}.

According to Terry Ramsaye, the escalating rumors (all manufactured by Fox’s best publicists) of her nefarious background caused little girls to swallow “their gum with excitement,” while big movie men to balk at the thought of meeting her in private {7}.

There was one man, however, who seemed completely undaunted by the soul-sucking powers of Ms. Theda Bara. He was Charles Brabin, the British-born director, a self-made man who knew the business of acting and directing.

She met him on set, where he directed her in several versions of The Vamp on screen for Fox. By April 1921, reporters were jumping the gun, claiming that Theda Bara and Charles Brabin were soon to wed.

Instead, she left for a European tour with her sister. The rumors began again when reporters caught the two kissing in New York upon her return. “Can’t a chap kiss a young lady when she returns from Europe [without being] married?” he asked the press {4}.

Love was in the air, though, and friendship swiftly turned into more. On July 2, 1921, a justice of the peace in Greenwich, Connecticut, united the two in marriage. Her love of film and stage receded not. Rather, it expanded to include this new facet–a man with “mental brilliance” {5} and a charisma that livened up the party wherever he went who offered her what would become the greatest role of her life.

When she wasn’t announcing her latest comeback, Theda Bara threw herself into the role of a 1920s Beverly Hills housewife. According to the Los Angeles Times, her home was tastefully furnished, though author Roberta Courtland describes it as “an old grandma house filled with antiques” {6}. Unfortunately, none of these reporters seemed the least bit interested in discussing her wedding jewelry.

To date, this writer has been unable to find any concrete information on Ms. Bara’s engagement or wedding rings. It’s possible, given the swiftness of their elopement, that there was no engagement ring. Rumor has it that Ms. Bara hated diamonds and wore only two jewels on her finger, an emerald ring reportedly given to her by a blind sheik and a turquoise ring that reportedly served talismanic purposes {1}.

Given the report that in 1957, Mr. Brabin sold at auction his wife’s collection of jewels, including “diamonds up to seven carats and delicately designed diamond, emerald, and platinum pieces” {4}, it stands to reason that these rumors emerged out of the heavy publicity surrounding her role as The Vamp.

In all likelihood, if she wore a wedding ring at all, it would have been a tasteful Art Deco piece which more closely complemented her efforts to “play the part of a sweet, essentially feminine woman” {6}. While she played this role happily at home, she continued staging a series of comebacks that would take her new part to the screen.

Rumors abound that her husband frowned upon her return to the screen. I doubt this is true, though they would offer a more pleasant answer to her failure to return to the screen than that she just couldn’t make it happen. To her credit, she would not allow that unfortunate truth diminish her happiness.

“[T]he wages of screen wickedness is domestic bliss,” she told a reporter in 1933 {4}. Nearly 20 years later, Hearst Hollywood columnist, Adela Rogers St. Johns, commented that the two were still happily married {4}. Theda Bara died in 1955, leaving the bulk of her estate to her sister, Charles needed none of her money.

Notes

  1. Bernstein, Matthew and Gaylyn Studlar. Visions of the East: Orientalism in Film. London: I. B. Tauris and Co. Ltd., 1997.
  2. Bonhams. “A Century of Movie Magic at Auction as curated by Turner Classic Movies.” November, 2013.
  3. DiGrazia, Christopher. “Theda Bara: An essay to accompany the Tambakos Silent Film Series: A Fool There Was (1915),” Kiss Me My Fool website, October 24, 2007.
  4. Genini, Ronald. Theda Bara: A Biography of the Silent Screen Vamp, with a Filmography. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc., 1996.
  5. IMDb. “Theda Bara, Biography.” Accessed August 7, 2014. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000847/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm.
  6. Petersen, Anne Helen. “Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Most Wicked Face of Theda Bara,” The Hairpin, January 8, 2013.
  7. Ramsaye, Terry. A Million and One Nights: A History of the Motion Picture. Abingdon, Oxon: Frank Cass & Co., Ltd., 2012.
  8. Silentmoviequeen. “Theda Bara Biography,” YouTube video, published July 11, 2012. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8ejQVRW0ts.

Go Retro with a 1960s Gemstone Engagement Ring

Retro Vintage Old European Cut Diamond and Ruby Ring

In the 1960s, color was king, and big and bold were in. One could submit that 60s-era jewelry represented the best of both the Art Nouveau and Art Deco periods. Strong architectural lines remained, but to these geometric lines were added sweeping curves and artful flourishes, lending an organic flair not seen in the early 1950s. It was a time of free love among the masses, so the wedding industry had to turn almost entirely toward America’s landed gentry for its cues.

The likes of the Vanderbilts, Kennedys, and Astors set the standard for designer engagement rings, buying their important ladies the best of Cartier, Tiffany, and Van Cleef and Arpels. Stylized floral themes emerged, even in wedding jewelry, and brooches, bracelets, and necklaces became larger and more ostentatious. One could argue that the wedding industry boomed under the heavy influence of these art-conscious trend setters.

If not for the insatiable and exotic appetites of these world travelers, these historic jewelry legends might have become stuffy and repressed in their designs. Instead, those who had all that money could buy wanted the unusual, the unreal, the unexpected. This leant a decided flair, even to engagement rings. Thus, we have the stunning, larger-than-life step-cut aquamarines flanked by diamonds in platinum, as well as sweeping swirls in platinum and yellow gold ornamented with blue sapphires, rubies, and diamonds.

With the onset of this new wave of art jewelry, stone size became only slightly less important (unless you were Elizabeth Taylor). A number of styles features modest blue  sapphires, interspersed with diamonds of equal size, which were displayed right alongside solitaires boasting large diamonds. Rubies were also popular, and sometimes designers used all three precious stones together. It was a time of showy beauty, and every one of these pieces evokes the nostalgia of a unique era.

If your sweetheart loves the high-style of Jacki Onassis Kennedy or Gloria Vanderbilt, may we suggest you surprise her with a 1960s retro-vintage engagement ring? We have a number of beautiful options in stock and would relish the opportunity to place a bit of history right into your hands. Just give us a call.

The History + Characteristics of the Cushion Cut

GIA 1.5 Carat Cushion-Cut Diamond Halo Engagement Ring

Capture the Essence! of 2014 Engagement Ring Trends with this Halo Engagement Ring featuring a GIA 1.5-Carat Cushion-Cut Diamond.

 

This stunning halo engagement ring is crafted of solid platinum. The central stone is a spectacular GIA-certified, 1.56-carat, cushion-cut diamond. Surrounding this dazzling center stone is a halo carved in platinum and paved in 20 round brilliant diamonds. The gallery, shoulder, and sides, edged in beautiful millgrain, are accented with another 74 round brilliant diamonds. This ring is sure to dazzle from every angle, particularly since two of this year’s most popular trends kiss in perfect platinum–the halo and the cushion cut.

Throughout the 1800s and into the early 1900s, before round brilliant diamonds took center stage, the Antique Cushion (Old Mine/Pillow) cut was the most popular style of diamond. During the mid-1900s, many of these antique diamonds were re-cut to meet market demand for round brilliants. It wasn’t until recently, when nostalgia and romance began to turn our heads back toward the royal diamonds of the 1800s that cushion cuts began to return to fashion.

Today the cushion cut enjoys the highest popularity among all the fancy cuts. Offering the romance of a candlelit room, this shape captures the light and throws it around with artful beauty, sometimes emanating more fire than even a round brilliant. Even in harsh direct light, the cushion shape captures the light and refracts it with romantic warmth.

Unlike most diamond cuts, the cushion has several variations that affect appearance in terms of fire, brilliance, and size. Depending on the proportions chosen by the cutter, a cushion cut can vary greatly in dimension and shape. In its original form (circa 1800s), the cut was square with rounded corners. However, modern cushions can be any shape between a rectangle and a square, with an open culet and rounded corners. Even with a modern cushion cut, you can be sure that your diamond is truly unique.

 

If your beloved tends toward the romance of days gone by, we highly recommend considering a cushion cut diamond engagement ring. That being said, we cannot emphasize enough the importance of doing your homework when it comes to buying a diamond. Learn all you can about the 4Cs, as well as about the different shapes and cuts. Particularly if you’re interested in a fancy cut, like the cushion, it is extremely important to seek a reputable jeweler who can show you a number of different facet patterns, sizes, and styles.

 

Wedding Jewelry Trends Take a Turn Toward the Beautifully Decorated East Indian Brides and Their Lavalier Necklaces

Fancy Link 5-Carat Diamond Necklace

A quick search on Google for ‘wedding jewelry trends’ fills the screen with luxurious images of beautifully decorated East Indian brides. Rich colors in hues of rust, brick, aubergine, olive green, and baby blue blend together, evoking every young girl’s Persian princess fantasies.

Long dangling earrings are nearly lost in elaborate headdresses sparkling with colorful gemstones and beads. Elaborate veils add an element of mystique, taking the exquisite beauty to a whole new level. Though each bride brings her own individual taste to bear on her overall look, there are several commonalities to them all.

Every surface shimmers with jewels and metallic fabric, and kohl and henna reign. Their dresses are rarely white; rather they involve rich silks in lavender, cream, champagne, olivine, rich reds, and many other vibrant colors. Their jewels are always elaborate and include jeweled hand chains, fancy anklets and toe rings, golden armbands, gorgeous bindi jewelry upon their foreheads, any number of stackable golden bracelets, chandelier style earrings, and gorgeous lavalier necklaces.

It is these elaborate necklaces that have caught our attention today. Even if you’re not going with the more traditional East Indian costume for your wedding, you can wear these beautiful necklaces. Many of the images popping up on Google show the more traditional white bridal gowns paired with these more delicious ornaments, demonstrating the power of the alluring east to influence contemporary bridal trends.

Here we offer a selection of our most delectable lavalier necklaces, sure to add a touch of sensuality and royalty to your bridal jewelry:

 

Antique Bezel Set Amethyst Pendant

 

This exquisite antique necklace features bezel-set natural amethysts in solid 10k gold. This necklace will add a touch of romantic royalty to your wedding jewelry, with its cushion-cut center stone, its pear-shaped drop stone, and the smaller halo of round and pear-shaped accent stones.

 

 

Retro Vintage Lavalier Pearl & Ruby Necklace

 

This stunning vintage necklace is a captivating choice for the bride who wishes to emulate the East India bride. Set with seed pearls and natural cushion cut rubies in a crossing draped pattern, this necklace is crafted of 14k yellow gold and will lay beautifully along the neckline of a champagne or lavender dress.

Floral Lavalier Diamond Necklace

 

 

 

Here we have a beautiful sterling silver and white diamond lavalier necklace in a floral motif. Over 400 round brilliant diamonds are bezel set into floral shapes for the chain and bead set into floral draping sections. The diamonds are set in sterling silver set over 18k gold. It’s patina and age make it perfect for a candlelit evening ceremony, and it would look lovely paired with a white wedding dress.

 

 

Go Retro-Vintage with a 1950s Engagement Ring

Capture the Essence! of Retro-Vintage with this 1950s Engagement Ring in Platinum and Diamonds. Photo ©2014 EraGem Jewelry.

Capture the Essence! of Retro-Vintage with this 1950s Engagement Ring in Platinum and Diamonds. Photo ©2014 EraGem Jewelry.

Retro meets vintage with 1950s engagement ring styles. The 1950s marked the beginning of Mid-Century Jewelry Design, with its turn toward the flashy and opulent. With style icons exuding the elegance of Grace Kelley’s and the freshness of Audrey Hepburn, the first decade of the mid-century marks the time when glamour reached its apex.

Even the normally conservative bridal industry threw open the curtains to let in a little flair. Diamonds dominated the scene, and a trend toward clustered arrangements afforded the most bling for your buck.

The round brilliant was beginning to outshine the transitional and Old Euro cuts of the previous decades, though a fair number of these romantic cuts remained in circulation. For the opulently wealthy diamonds surrounded diamonds, while those of lesser means chose the illusion setting, a style in which a demure diamond is surrounded by a series of architectural facets carved directly into the metal.

Yellow gold once again fell out of favor, as white gold and platinum resumed their position of dominance. When yellow gold was used, it was typically topped with platinum or white gold so as to maximize the reflection of the diamonds.

Although 1950s engagement ring bands remained fairly discreet, their shoulders grew in size to accommodate the extra bling factor. Halos of single-cut diamonds surrounded stunning central stones, and small bead-set Old Euro cut diamonds edged the tops of the shoulders. It was fairly rare to see a band without accent stones of some kind.

If your sweetheart is a glamour girl with the style and sophistication of Hollywood’s most celebrated movie stars, may we recommend a perusal of our vintage 1950s engagement rings?

We invite you to visit our vintage engagement rings page, or give us a call if you’d like to view them in person.

The Oval Cut Take the Fore in Engagement Ring Trends

Capture the Essence! of Celebrity Ovals with this Oval-Cut Blue Sapphire and Diamond Halo Engagement Ring. Photo ©2014 EraGem Jewelry.

Capture the Essence! of Celebrity Ovals with this Oval-Cut Blue Sapphire and Diamond Halo Engagement Ring. Photo ©2014 EraGem Jewelry.

According to Today Style, more and more women are opting for oval-cut diamonds and gemstones for their engagement rings, rather than the more traditional round brilliants. It seems that the oval lends a more contemporary feel, especially when mounted east-west, as opposed to the traditional north-south orientation typically associated with fancy-cut stones. There are many advantages to an oval-cut diamond or gemstone. Though aesthetics may play the larger part in this new trend, we believe there are a number of other compelling reasons to choose oval diamonds.

  1. Optimizes Carat Weight. Their ovoid shape typically makes oval diamonds and gemstones appear larger to the naked eye than a round brilliant of the same carat weight.
  2. Slenderizing. Whether worn horizontally or vertically, an oval-cut stone slenderizes the fingers of the hand on which it’s worn.
  3. Price Point. Carat for carat, oval-cut stones typically cost less than round brilliants, all other aspects being equal.
  4. Diamond Sparkle. Though no cut can contend with the sparkle of a round brilliant, since oval diamonds are cut with many of the same proportions they come in at a close second in brilliance and fire.
  5. Celebrity Choice. The oval cut has been the choice in engagement rings for such well-known celebrities as Katie Holmes (diamond), Kate Middleton (sapphire in a halo of diamonds), Blake Lively (pink diamond), and Katharine McPhee (yellow diamond).

If you’re considering an oval diamond ,we recommend that you view them in person before purchasing. Ovals must be cut with expert precision, and only with your own eye in the presence of a knowledgeable jeweler can you be sure that your stone will have the dazzle your sweetheart deserves.

Wedding Jewelry Trends Incorporate Beautiful Brooches

3.5 Carat Diamond Brooch in Platinum

Thanks to First Lady, Michelle Obama, as well as the ever-popular British Royals, Queen Elizabeth II and Kate Middleton, the brooch has come to stay. A beautiful brooch can add a certain flair, while at the same time establishing a classic elegance to any ensemble. This truth has finally asserted itself into wedding jewelry trends, and we can’t be more thrilled.

Brides are using brooches to upstyle their shoes, their hair, their bustles, their veils, and more. They’re even replacing the flowers in their bouquets with the most exquisite arrangements of vintage brooches. We have seen gorgeous pins embellishing invitations, pinned to the groom in lieu of a boutonniere, and even affixed to the fondant on the edge of wedding cakes.

Many of these beauties are handed down or borrowed from family members, and these are the ones we would expect a bride to wear on her bustle, or in her hair, or filling out her bouquet. Still others are sourced from vintage shops, thrift stores, or flea markets, and it makes sense to use these rhinestone brooches to add a flourish to your invitations, to the cake, or to your table decorations.

Perhaps, though, you would like to embellish your dress with a finer piece of authentic antique jewelry. That’s where we can help!

Here we offer a sampling of some of our most beautiful brooches featuring authentic gemstones and diamonds. These you might want to wear on your veil, or pin it to your groom’s lapel, or you may want your bouquet’s centerpiece to become a family heirloom to pass on to your daughter or granddaughter one day.

Here we offer several of our most beautiful brooches which will add more than a touch of sophisticated elegance to your wedding day: 

 

Antique Art Deco Diamond Brooch

 

This gorgeous antique Art Deco bar pin brooch would make a perfect accent for your hair or headpiece. It is crafted of solid ornate platinum filigree with a total of 2-2/3 carats of genuine Old European cut diamonds.

Art Deco Created Sapphire Filigree Brooch

 

 

 

 

This stunning petite Art Deco filigree brooch is crafted of 14k white gold, featuring three lozenge cut created blue sapphires in bezel settings. Finished with ornate milgrain edging, this beautiful brooch would be the perfect “something blue” for your wedding day.

 

Natural Opal and Diamond Brooch

 

 

This Victorian-style brooch features a magnificent opal with stunning round and baguette diamond accents. This gorgeous piece is a statement piece, sure to add the elegance and sophistication of royalty to your wedding ensemble.